Saturday, February 09, 2013

British Vs. American English: Finance Terminology


British English (BrE)
American English (AmE)
Annual general meeting
Annual stockholders meeting
Authorised share capital
Authorized capital stock
Barometer stock
Bellwether stock
Base rate
Prime rate
Bridging loan
Bridge loan
Building society
Saving and loan association
Cash machine
ATM
Cheque
Check
Company
Corporation
Creditors
Accounts payable
Current account
Checking account
Debtors
Accounts receivable
Merchant bank
Investment bank
Notes
Bills
Ordinary share
Common stock
Overheads
Overhead
Pence
Cents
Pounds
Dollars
Property
Real estate
Quid
Buck
Quoted company
Listed company
Retail price index
Consumer price index
Share
Stock
Shareholder
Stockholder
Shareholder's equity
Stockholder's equity
Stock
Inventory
Trade union
Labor union
Unit trusts
Mutual funds
Visible trade
Merchandise trade 

This ongoing list was compiled by Laurence Brown. Laurence is a British expat living in Indianapolis, Indiana. He is a contributor for BBC America and has written for Anglotopia. He is Editor-in-chief of Lost in the Pond and loves nothing more than to share his articles with anglophiles, expats, and other interested parties on social media. Follow Lost in the Pond on Facebook, Twitter and Google+.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

I thought labour was the British version?

Laurence Brown said...

Ooh, well spotted. This compendium is very much a work-in-progress, so I certainly appreciate the input.

Jade Graham said...

Examination of the dynamics of such a market, even within the neo-classical framework, Milton Barbarosh

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