Tuesday, April 30, 2013

33 American Girls Names That Aren't As Popular In Britain

Following on from our list of American boys names, here are 33 American girls names that are also not as popular across the Pond.

Monday, April 29, 2013

31 American Boys Names That Aren't as Popular in Britain

For the most part, American and British male baby names have born many similarities over the years: both countries have a lot of Davids, Stevens, and Scotts. 

Both seem to agree that Peter, John, and Michael are worth keeping around. 

But what about those first names that Brits always hear on American TV or in films? You know, those ones that sound impossibly American, like Bryce or Landon or Taylor

Well, here are 31 American boys names that aren't, for whatever reason, as popular in Britain.

Sunday, April 28, 2013

REVIEW: Anglotopia's Dictionary of British English

Even for the most dedicated Anglophile out there, navigating the British lexicon with any degree of dignity can often be a rather difficult task. With words like codswallop, higgledy-piggledy and plonker contributing to the British vernacular, it is not surprising that certain words and expressions get lost in the Pond.

However, thanks to a splendid new book by editor of Anglotopia Jonathan Thomas, the whole subject has become considerably more clear.

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Why Do Americans Pronounce 'Schedule' Differently to the British?

A pet peeve of certain British prescriptivists (that is, Brits who do not readily welcome change to the language) is the American pronunciation of schedule. In its Americanised form, it is one of those words - along with vase, anti-, and yoghurt - that drives defenders of the British version to fits of near rage.

But why should this be? Are the British historically and linguistically correct to pronounce it shed-yul? Or are they just upset that "the yanks" changed yet another word?

Tuesday, April 23, 2013

Shakespeare In America: How The Bard's Plays Transcended The Atlantic

Today is the 397th anniversary of William Shakespeare's death and, if you believe word of mouth, the 449th anniversary of his birth. The British playwright brought to the world a plethora of instantly quotable monologues, coined thousands of words still in use today, and of course, wrote some of the most lauded works in the history of stage.

It is little surprise, then, that Shakespeare remains wildly popular within theatre circles in a certain English-speaking nation known as the United States.

The Bard's work features greatly in High School drama curricula, not to mention that of particular English departments. Many community theatres across the country take delight in performing Shakespeare plays and, owing to a lack of copyright, professional theatre companies are more readily able to budget stipends for their cast and crew when producing a heavyweight show such as Richard III.

Monday, April 22, 2013

The Pledge of Allegiance? Don't You Know My Children Are British?

Guest Post by Emma Porter

This post, I wish to first stress, is not about whether American children should or should not stand up and say the Pledge of Allegiance. It is about my own experiences and observations of how the pledge affects my own non-naturalized, British children.

I am no stranger to living overseas, and near the end of 2010, I moved to Arizona with my family. The children were then 7 years and not far off 3 years respectively.

I was prepared for adjustments and with a school-aged child, I learnt quickly things I’d never even thought about previously.

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

Terrorism In Britain And The United States: Thoughts From a British Expat

In light of yesterday's terrorist attack at the Boston Marathon, I felt compelled to share my thoughts on the subject of terrorism - particularly as it pertains to Britain and the USA.

Allow me to start with a little perspective.

It is well known that in the Middle East, terrorist attacks occur at a far more frequent rate than in Britain and the U.S.. To that end, it is not uncommon to read the headline, "48 Iraqis Killed By Roadside Bomb." But even though so many innocent civilians die in these attacks, it is also not uncommon for we in the Western World to feel utterly indifferent to such headlines. Until it happens to us.

Sunday, April 14, 2013

Dear Britain, Not All Americans Are Stupid

Dear Britain, I am writing to let you (and a certain number of your population) know that, contrary to popular belief, not all Americans are stupid.

I will grant you, there are several reality TV stars, actors, and members of congress who seem hell-bent on challenging this position, but America does have its fair share of intellectuals too.

Tuesday, April 09, 2013

50 British Words Americans Love to Hear

The American fascination with all things British does not simply stop at Harry Potter, Dr. Who and Downton Abbey. Any US-bound British expat will tell you that the "yanks" are just as interested in the wonderful and mysterious British lexicon, which includes approximately 3,383,982 words for inebriated, a seemingly endless pool of insults, and the most creative compendium of sex words on the planet. Here are 50 British words that Americans love to hear.

Monday, April 08, 2013

5 of the Most Common Stereotypes Faced by British Expats


Guest Post by The Expat Hub. 

If you’ve ever visited the USA as a Brit then there’s a very high chance that you will have been asked at least one bizarre question from one of your cousins from across the Atlantic. Whether they comment on your funny accent or make you roll yours eyes by their lack of geographic knowledge, as a tourist you will only be there for a short time. If you go to the US as an expat however, it’s a whole new kettle of fish (weird British saying). After all you intend to spend (possibly) the rest of your life in the States so you can bet your bottom Dollar (a weird US saying) that you will be faced with all of the following misconceptions. As the famous Brit saying goes, keep calm and carry on!

Thursday, April 04, 2013

British Vs. American English: Food Terminology


British English (BrE)
American English (AmE)
Aubergine
Eggplant
Beetroot
Beet
Biscuit
Cookie
Candy floss
Cotton candy
Chili con carne
Chili
Chili sauce
Hot sauce
Chips
Fries
Chocolate bar
Candy bar
Coriander
Cilantro
Corn flower
Corn starch
Cos lettuce
Romaine lettuce
Courgette
Zucchini
Crisps
Potato chips
Digestives
Graham crackers
Fish fingers
Fish sticks
Gammon
Ham
Ice lolly
Popsicle
Icing
Frosting
Jam
Fruit preserves (also jam)
Jelly
Jell-O
Kebab
Gyro
Macaroni cheese
Mac and cheese
Minced meat
Ground meat
Porridge
Oatmeal
Prawn
Shrimp
Profiterole
Cream puff
Pudding
Dessert
Rapeseed oil
Canola oil
Scone
Biscuit
Ready salted
Original
Skimmed milk
Skim milk
Spaghetti bolognese
Spaghetti
Spring onion
Scallion
Swiss roll
Jelly roll
Tinned food
Canned food
Treacle
Molasses
Water biscuits
Crackers

This ongoing list was compiled by Laurence Brown. Laurence is a British expat living in Indianapolis, Indiana. He is a contributor for BBC America and has written for Anglotopia. He is Editor-in-chief of Lost in the Pond and loves nothing more than to share his articles with anglophiles, expats, and other interested parties on social media. Follow Lost in the Pond on Facebook, Twitter and Google+.

Wednesday, April 03, 2013

5 American Food Chains You Won't Find In Britain

Anyone who has spent a decent amount of time in Britain will know (often to their chagrin) that fast food chains like McDonald's, Burger King, and Subway are seemingly just as numerous over there as they are in the United States. But what about other well-known American food chains? Ones that are wildly popular but have no identity in Britain? Here are 5 American Food Chains You Won't Find In Britain.

Monday, April 01, 2013

British English Vs. American English: Football Terminology


British English (BrE)
American English (AmE)
Football
Soccer
Offside
Offside, offsides
American Football
Football
Attack
Offense
Score a goal
Make a goal
Football boot
Cleat
Trainers
Tennis Shoes, sneakers
Extra-time
Overtime
Draw
Tie
Penalty
P.K.
Shin pads
Shin guards
Kit
Uniform
One-nil
One-to-zero
Pitch
Field
This ongoing list was compiled by Laurence Brown. Laurence is a British expat living in Indianapolis, Indiana. He is a contributor for BBC America and has written for Anglotopia. He is Editor-in-chief of Lost in the Pond and loves nothing more than to share his articles with anglophiles, expats, and other interested parties on social media. Follow Lost in the Pond on Facebook, Twitter and Google+.

British vs. American English: People Terminology


British English (BrE)
American English (AmE)
Mum/mummy/mam
Mom/mommy/mama
Dad/daddy/old man/pops
Dad/pop/pa/pappy
Brother/bruv
Brother/bro
Baby/nipper/bairn/babby
Baby/papoose/infant
Gran/granny/nan/nanna/grandma
Grandma/grammy/mamaw/gramma/mimi
Grandad
Granddad/gramps/pops/grandpa/grandpappy
Friend/mate/bezzy
Friend/buddy/bestie/BFF
Boy/lad/chap
Boy/dude/guy
Girl/lass/bird
Girl/chick
Madam
Ma’am

This ongoing list was compiled by Laurence Brown. Laurence is a British expat living in Indianapolis, Indiana. He is a contributor for BBC America and has written for Anglotopia. He is Editor-in-chief of Lost in the Pond and loves nothing more than to share his articles with anglophiles, expats, and other interested parties on social media. Follow Lost in the Pond on Facebook, Twitter and Google+.

British Vs. American English: Drink Terminology


British English (BrE)
American English (AmE)
Bitter
Pale ale
Fizzy drink
Pop/soda/coke/tonic
Skimmed milk
Skim milk
Spirit
Liquor
This ongoing list was compiled by Laurence Brown. Laurence is a British expat living in Indianapolis, Indiana. He is a contributor for BBC America and has written for Anglotopia. He is Editor-in-chief of Lost in the Pond and loves nothing more than to share his articles with anglophiles, expats, and other interested parties on social media. Follow Lost in the Pond on Facebook, Twitter and Google+.

British vs. American English: General Parenting Terminology


British English (BrE)
American English (AmE)
Cot
Crib
Dad/Daddy
Dad/Daddy/Papa
Dummy
Pacifier
Little or younger brother
Little or younger brother/Kid brother
Little or younger sister
Little or younger sister/Kid sister
Mum/Mummy/Mam
Mom/Mommy/Mama
Nappy
Diaper
Parents
Parents/Folks
Playgroup
Daycare
Pushchair
Stroller
Rucksack
Knapsack/Backpack

This ongoing list was compiled by Laurence Brown. Laurence is a British expat living in Indianapolis, Indiana. He is a contributor for BBC America and has written for Anglotopia. He is Editor-in-chief of Lost in the Pond and loves nothing more than to share his articles with anglophiles, expats, and other interested parties on social media. Follow Lost in the Pond on Facebook, Twitter and Google+.