Thursday, April 04, 2013

British Vs. American English: Food Terminology


British English (BrE)
American English (AmE)
Aubergine
Eggplant
Beetroot
Beet
Biscuit
Cookie
Candy floss
Cotton candy
Chili con carne
Chili
Chili sauce
Hot sauce
Chips
Fries
Chocolate bar
Candy bar
Coriander
Cilantro
Corn flower
Corn starch
Cos lettuce
Romaine lettuce
Courgette
Zucchini
Crisps
Potato chips
Digestives
Graham crackers
Fish fingers
Fish sticks
Gammon
Ham
Ice lolly
Popsicle
Icing
Frosting
Jam
Fruit preserves (also jam)
Jelly
Jell-O
Kebab
Gyro
Macaroni cheese
Mac and cheese
Minced meat
Ground meat
Porridge
Oatmeal
Prawn
Shrimp
Profiterole
Cream puff
Pudding
Dessert
Rapeseed oil
Canola oil
Scone
Biscuit
Ready salted
Original
Skimmed milk
Skim milk
Spaghetti bolognese
Spaghetti
Spring onion
Scallion
Swiss roll
Jelly roll
Tinned food
Canned food
Treacle
Molasses
Water biscuits
Crackers

This ongoing list was compiled by Laurence Brown. Laurence is a British expat living in Indianapolis, Indiana. He is a contributor for BBC America and has written for Anglotopia. He is Editor-in-chief of Lost in the Pond and loves nothing more than to share his articles with anglophiles, expats, and other interested parties on social media. Follow Lost in the Pond on Facebook, Twitter and Google+.

13 comments:

Bonnie Rose said...

I think I am pretty good at using the English words now that we are back in England. I gotta remember to pronounce Basil correctly.

Bonnie Rose | A Compass Rose

Laurence Brown said...

Ah yes. I have a video coming up on food pronunciations!

Laura Sowers said...

Interesting! Thank you.

Laurence Brown said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Laurence Brown said...

Thank you, Laura. Here's a growing compendium of word differences.

Follow Lost In The Pond | Twitter | Facebook | Google+ | RSS | Pinterest | Instagram

Lily said...

The British pronunciations always trip me up plus, what's with adding a "u" to everything? Colour, flavour, favourite... haha

Laurence Brown said...

Haha! Lily, I long to write a post on the "u" difference. Stay tuned.

Follow Lost In The Pond | Twitter | Facebook | Google+ | RSS | Pinterest | Instagram

Rachel said...

Stationery is another trans-Atlantic minefield...and pants.

macsnafu said...

Wait--the British call gelatin "jelly"? As a semantic nickname, that makes sense, but then what do they call jelly? You know the cheaper stuff that's not jam or preserves, i.e. grape jelly that kids like to use for peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, or people put on toast? American jelly is made with pectin, not gelatin. Flavored gelatins, like the brand "Jell-O" are usually used for desserts, although sometimes unflavored gelatin is used for things like aspic.


Liz Helton said...

had to laugh at digestives vs. graham crackers. too funny.

Caleb Pike said...

I think we just call it all jam, be it cheap or fancy.

Anonymous said...

I personally disagree with the Kebab and Gyro examples. I don't like Gyros, but I love Kebabs. Whilst living in England I have noticed it's always called a Kebab, but Gyros are of Greek origin whilst Kebabs are Middle Eastern, and they are also different in general. In the NE US where I'm from people refer to the food accordingly (idk about everywhere).

Anonymous said...

I'm sure you've figured it out by now but I just wanted to point out that "Jell-O" is just one of those brand "ingrainings". Like Kleenex, Chapstick and Sharpie but what you really mean is tissue, lip balm and a permanent marker. =]

Post a Comment

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...