Tuesday, May 12, 2015

WATCH: British Guy Tries to Guess the Meaning of Obscure U.S. Slang Words

In this week's video, I attempt (and—it should be said—fail) to guess the meaning of these 16 regional U.S. slang words, some of which are archaic. Watch the video below.




This article was written by Laurence Brown. Laurence is a British expat living in Indianapolis, Indiana, and has written for BBC America and Anglotopia. He is Editor-in-chief of Lost in the Pond and loves nothing more than to share these articles with anglophiles, expats, and other interested parties on social media. Follow Lost in the Pond on Facebook, Twitter and Google+.

8 comments:

Brittaney said...

If it makes you feel any better, I am an America who has lived in the Northeast, Texas and Oklahoma and I don't recognize a single one of these words.

Renata said...

Wherever did you get these words? I've never heard of any of them so I guess that's two birks.

Rebekah said...

You're hilarious!

Anonymous said...

Re: Larruping - heard it all my life. LOL

It's also used in Texas, probably Arkansas and Louisiana.

First, since it is basically southern, drop the final "g".
Second the "a" is sounded like "air".
So it sounds like "lairuppin"

Anonymous said...

Born & raised in Indiana & have never heard any of these words. I would love to hear their meanings. You are very funny.

Unknown said...

Snirt, you will see it on the side of Indiana roads for example...

Snow + dirt....the black snow that develops all winter

steve palmberg said...

snirt.. the stuff you will see in Indiana on the side of the roads as winter progresses....dirt + snow

Zef Macedo said...

Those are really obscure words. Wow! The only one I knew was snirt.

Post a Comment

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...