Thursday, January 07, 2016

3 American Words Not Widely Used In Britain | U

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Continuing an alphabetised list of words and phrases common to the U.S. that are not widely used in the UK, here are 3 such words beginning with the letter 'U'.


1. Undershirt 
An upper undergarment with no collar, and with short or no sleeves, worn next to the skin under a shirt. Known as a semmit in Scotland and Northern Ireland.

2. Upscale 
Relating to goods targeted at high-income consumers. UK equivalent: upmarket.

3. Uptown 

(In, to, toward, or related to) either the upper section or the residential district of a city; e.g., in Manhattan, New York City the term refers to the northern end of Manhattan, generally speaking, north of 59th Street; see also Uptown, Minneapolis; Uptown, Chicago; Uptown New Orleans; compare downtown. Often has implications of being a desirable or upscale neighborhood. However, in Butte, Montana and Charlotte, North Carolina, "Uptown" refers to what would be called "downtown" in most other cities.

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Laurence Brown is a British man documenting his life in the truly bizarre and beautiful world of America. Before the end of the decade, he plans to achieve his goal of visiting all 50 United States - highlighting each one in Lost in the Pond's Finding America web series. To help fund this exciting project, consider becoming a patron. Your contribution would be incredibly useful.

1 comment:

Dave D said...

My dad was Scottish and the word is "simmit".

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